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Lunges

Exercise!

Lunges are a popluar, long-standing and simple but very effective exercise for the legs. They involve balance and coordination, which is very useful for sports as well as muscle development. The dumbell version of the Lunge is the easiest to start with though it can also be done with a barbell.

Tips: Don't keep your legs in a straight line. Keep them horizontally separated by about six inches to keep your balance. Doing this increases support, stablizing your body. Don't lean forward on the way down - this can cause you to lose your balance and can place unnecessary stress on your back.

Muscles: Upper thigh and buttocks; Hip extensors, quadriceps

How to perform The Lunge Exercise:

  1. Place barbell on back as in squatting, or use dumbbells at arms length by hips.
  2. Step forward with leg about 30 inches. Keep front foot flat on the floor, rear foot balanced on toes, and lower the front thigh until parallel to the floor. Push back leg to starting position. Alternate legs.
  3. Do as many reps as you can in 2 minutes with the right leg (about 10 to 20), then repeat with the left leg.

Lunges - Barbell

Walking Lunges

Notes

Keep torso upright during lunge; flexible hip flexors are important.

A long lunge emphasizes the Gluteus Maximus; a short lunge emphasizes Quadriceps.

How to perform Walking Lunges:

  1. Grab a barbell to hold on your shoulders, or a pair of dumbbells to hold at your sides. Stand with your feet hip-width apart at one end of your house or gym. Safety Note: If you are new to this exercise, use the dumbbells until you become stronger.
  2. Lunge forward with your left leg bending the knee 90-degrees. Your right knee should also bend and almost touch the floor.
  3. Stand and bring your right foot up next to your left, then repeat with the right leg lunging forward. That is one repetition.
  4. Continue until you have completed half your repetitions in this direction. Turn and do the same number of walking lunges back to your starting point.

Walking Lunges with Dumbbells

Lunges with Lateral Raise

This exercise works the legs, core, butt and shoulders.

How to perform Lunges with Lateral Raise Exercise:

  1. Stand with your legs just less than shoulder-width apart. Hold a 3 to 5 pound dumbbell with both hands in front of your thighs. Raise your right heel slightly and step back about 2 feet with your right food, keeping your knees slightly bent.
  2. Keeping your back and arms straight, bend both legs to 90-degree angles and raise your arms to shoulder height. Lower your arms and straighten your legs (do not move your right foot) to complete the repetition.
  3. Do as many reps as you can in 2 minutes with the right leg (about 10 to 20), then repeat with the left leg.

Lunges with Lateral Raise Exercise

Windmill Lunges

Windmill Lunges can solidify your core. Solidify your core and prevent low-back problems...

Your core is the center of your body's physical movements, strength, and power. It supports you in everything you do from walking and dancing to sitting in a chair. Keeping it strong and functional can help you in everyday activities.

How to perform Windmill Lunges:

  1. Stand holding a pair of dumbbells at your sides, feet hip-width apart.
  2. Lunge forward with your left leg until your left knee is bend 90-degrees.
  3. Step back to the starting position.
  4. Now lunge out at a 45-degree angle with your left leg, then return.
  5. Lunge side-ways with your left leg, then return.
  6. Lunge straight back with your left leg, then return.
  7. Now step straight back with your right leg, then return.
  8. Lunge back at a 45-degree angle with your right leg, then return.
  9. Lunge side-ways with your right leg, then return.
  10. Lunge forward at a 45-degree angle with your right leg, then return.
  11. Lunge forward with your right leg, then return. That is one complete set.

Windmill Lunges

Remember: Go Low!

People who focus on nailing range of motion during squats and lunges - which means a 90-degree bend in the knees - became stronger and lost an average of 15 percent more fat than those who added extra weight but shortened the movement. There was a metabolism benefit, too. Those who got to 90-degrees retained more lean muscle mass after a month-long hiatus. Source: Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research.


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