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Worm Pudding

Happy Healthy Holidays!

These sweet and chewy wrigglers are much more delicious. Adding them to this yummy Worm Pudding dessert is the perfect April Fool's Day project for little hands.

Gummy Worms in Worm Pudding

Recipe Ingredients

1 cup sugar
2/3 cup unsweetened cocoa powder
1/4 cup plus 2 tablespoons cornstarch
5 cups milk
2 teaspoons vanilla extract
1 cup heavy cream, whipped, or 2 containers (8 ounces each) frozen whipped topping, thawed
2 packages (15 ounces each) chocolate sandwich cookies, crumbled and divided
4 cups worm shaped gummy candies

Recipe Directions

Sift sugar, cocoa and cornstarch into a large saucepan; mix thoroughly. Whisk in milk until combined. Heat mixture over medium heat, whisking constantly, until it is thickened and comes to a boil, about 2 minutes.

Whisk in vanilla. Reduce heat to low; simmer for 1 minute. Remove saucepan from heat; immediately transfer mixture to a large bowl. Let cool for 10 minutes.

Fold whipped cream into mixture until well blended. Add 2 cups cookie crumbs; mix gently until combined.

Spoon about 1/3 cup chocolate cookie crumbs into each of 8 bowls. Add 1 cup pudding to each bowl; sprinkle evenly with remaining cookie crumbs. Cover with plastic wrap; chill until set, about 1 hour.

Divide worms among bowls, arranging some on top, some hanging over the edges and some poking into the pudding.

Recipe Tip

Try making this pudding (through Step 2) a day ahead and chill it until serving time. If you do so, be sure to cover the bowl with plastic wrap, pressing the wrap right onto the surface of the pudding. That prevents a skin from forming. Finish the Worm Pudding just before serving.

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April Fool's Day Lore

April Fools Day

When the western world used the Julian calendar, the year began on March 25th because they celebrated the start of a new year with the start of spring. However since that fell in the Holy Week, the celebrated it on the first of April. However when we switched to the Gregorian calendar in the 1500s, we moved the New Year to the first of January. According to the most widely told story, those who still celebrated the New Year on April 1st were called April fools.







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