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Cooking Couscous

Cooking tips for the caring cook.

Cooking Couscous

What is couscous?

Couscous is made from semolina that is rolled into small granules or pellets and truly is one of the one tastiest side dishes you can create quickly.

Like pasta or rice, it can serve many culinary purposes. It is simple to prepare - usually you just add boiling water and let it sit. Couscous is pre-cooked, so it can be ready in 10 quick minutes!

Couscous is a good low-fat source of complex carbohydrates and a good-for-you grain food.

Cooking Couscous

  • To cook couscous, pour 1 cup of quick-cooking couscous into 1 cup of boiling water or stock (adds a nice flavor) with about 1/2 teaspoon of salt. Remove from heat, cover - a dish towel works well, or a plate, and let stand 5 minutes.
  • Fluff the couscous with a fork before serving.
  • Add exotic spices or sauces to your couscous or leave it plain.

Quick Recipe: Exotic Couscous Tabouleh

Mix chopped tomatoes, bell peppers, onions, and cilantro with lemon juice and garlic then add to cooked couscous.

What Spices are Exotic?

Exotic spices include: Saffron Spice

  • Saffron - easily the most expensive spice in the world. Recommended: Saffron, organic & pure Mehr sargol saffron
  • Grains of Paradise, also known as Melegueta pepper or Guinea grains. Related to both ginger and cardamom and was commonly used as a pepper substitute. Widely used in Caribbean and African cooking. Imparts a hot, spicy, aromatic flavor to any dish.
  • Sumac - must practice caution as there are some varieties of Sumac that are poisonous. The berry or powder is used as a souring agent and imparts a lemony flavor. Often used to complement fish and red meat.
  • Amchur Powder - made from unripe mangos that have been sliced, sun dried and then ground into a fine powder. Commonly used as a souring agent in North Indian cooking.
  • Juniper berries - They have an aromatic flavor with a sweet accent and are popular in European cuisines.
  • Kala Jeera is in the parsley family and is popular in Northern Indian Cuisine to flavor rice and meat dishes.
  • Fennel Pollen - Just a pinch of Fennel Pollen can make an average dish extraordinary!

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