Food Label Facts

Food Label Facts

Food Label Facts
Food Label Facts

The food label facts are that the use of terms such as low fat and low calorie are now heavily regulated by the government for consistency in meaning. This means manufacturers cannot sell under false pretenses; however, it also means higher costs to consumers. Once upon a time, a manufacturer was honest or went out of business – it truly was that simple. No longer… Now we find ourselves wallowing in a sea of terms and regulations that are next to impossible to keep up on.

Studies show that most people don’t even read food labels. For example, Time Magazine came out with an article back in 2011 about this very topic. See Study: Why People Don’t Read Nutrition Labels.

No surprise; people are busy and just want to eat what they like. Yet, we’re stuck with all the labeling and ever-changing terminology, so following we’ll lay out what the more common labels actually mean. This way, when you see a boast on a package such as “Low fat”, you’ll know just what that means without having to dig out reading glasses to read the fine print.

What the Different Food Label Facts Mean

  • Calorie free: Fewer than 5 calories per serving.
  • Sugar free: Less than 0.5 grams of sugar per serving.
  • Fat free: Less than 0.5 grams of total fat per serving.
  • Low fat: 3 grams or fewer of total fat grams per serving.
  • Low saturated fat: 1 gram or less per serving.
  • Low sodium: Fewer than 140 milligrams per serving.
  • Very low sodium: Fewer than 140 milligrams per serving.
  • Low cholesterol: Fewer than 20 milligrams per serving.
  • Low calorie:40 calories or fewer per serving.
  • Lean: Fewer than 10 grams of fat, 4 grams of saturated fat and 95 milligrams of cholesterol per serving and per 100 grams of meat, poultry, or seafood.
  • Extra lean: Fewer than 5 grams of fat, 2 grams of saturated fat, and 95 milligrams of cholesterol per serving and per 100 grams of meat, poultry, or seafood.
  • High: One serving contains 20 percent of more of the Daily Value for that nutrient.
  • Good source: One serving contains 10 to 19 percent of the Daily Value for that nutrient.
  • Reduced: A nutritionally altered product that contains 25 percent less of a nutrient or calories than the regular product.
  • Less: A food (that may or may not be altered) that contains 25 percent less of a nutrient or calories than the regular product or food.
  • Light: A nutritionally altered product that contains one-third fewer calories or half of the fat of the regular food or product. It can also mean that the sodium content of a low-calorie, low-fat food has been reduced by half.
  • More: One serving contains at least 10 percent more of the Daily Value of a nutrient than the regular food or product.

A few other common terms that might need some explanation are as follows.

    • From concentrate: juices from concentrate should have the same nutritional value as the original juice product. Concentrate means that at some point, much of the water was removed for easier shipping, and water was added back in to reconstitute the original consistency of the juice. (Think frozen orange juice.)
    • Sugar alcohol (or polyols): These naturally occurring sweeteners are often used as sugar substitutes because they provide anywhere from half to one-third the calories of regular sugar. Also, unlike regular sugar, they don’t cause an immediate jump in blood sugar. Some common sugar alcohols are mannitol, sorbitol, xylitol, lactitol, isomalt, maltitol, and hydrogenated starch hydroslysates (HSH). Consuming sugar alcohols in high volumes can cuase abnormal gas, discomfort and diahrrea.
    • Multigrain, whole grain: These terms are not interchangeable. Whole grain means that all parts of the grain kernel – the bran, germ and endosperm – are used in the making of the product. Multigrain, however, means that a food contains more than one type of grain. Whole gran foods – listed as “whole grain,” “whole wheat,” and “whole oats” are the healthier choice.

Warning

Most fat-free products contain high amounts of sugar in order to make up for the loss of taste from the fat. On the flip side, low sugar products usually have a higher fat content. Read the food label facts on labels, then choose wisely.

Sources

  • Eat Any Sugar Alcohol Lately?”, Yale-New Haven Hospital
  • Katherine Zeratsky, R.D., Nutrition and Healthy Eating Q & A, Mayo Clinic

School Luncheons 1905

School Luncheons 1905

Looking back in time can be both fun and fascinating! I’ve been doing a lot of that lately going through recipe booklets and cookbooks from my grandmother’s vast collection.

Being a personal passion, I couldn’t just allow these books to sit and get older and more yellowed without trying to digitize them, a project I’ve been and will continue to work on.

With that said, today I’m introducing “School Luncheons Cookbook Vintage 1905 by Armour and Company”.

School Luncheons 1905
School Luncheons 1905

A Peak Inside

The School Luncheons Problem

Excerpt from page 3…

“The school luncheon is a problem, and only the house mother can solve it by giving the subject careful attention daily.”

“Proper food must be supplied the growing boys and girls, or they will become stunted, not only physically, but mentally.”

“If it is possible a child should come home for the noonday meal. A bowl of hot broth should be in readiness, with a plate of crackers or toast, a baked apple with cream and some cookies. This makes a wholesome and satisfying lunch. The child will go back to school refreshed by the brisk walk.”

The Week-About System

Excerpt from page 6…

“If several children eat together, the luncheon may be packed in a hamper basket. It is quite an idea for one mother to prepare luncheons for one week for a neighbor’s children besides her own. This week-about system relieves the mother and gives the children variety.”

“Folding drinking cups or small tumblers should be given each child; the water question is just as important as food. It is far safer to have a small flask of pure water in the luncheon box than to allow promiscuous drinking from tin cups provided in the schools and the use of city water, unless one is absolutely sure that the water supply is pure.”

Motherly Love Notes

Excerpt from page 9…

“One mother used to occassionally put a little note like this in the luncheon box:”

“My Dear M—-:”
“Mother knows the lessons are unusually hard today, but do your best and when you come home there will be a surprise for you. Lovingly, Mother.”

“This takes only a moment, and is a source of inspiration and encouragement to the child. The ‘surprise’ may be some wished-for object, a guest invited to supper, a trip to the city or matinee tickets.”

Motherly Love Notes
Motherly Love Notes

School Luncheons: The Costs Back Then

Excerpt from page 20…

“Sufficient and nutritious luncheons can be furnished to the pupils of a large school for from three to five cents each, but from our present knowledge, it would require about a ten-cent luncheon to satisfy the taste of the American scholar.”

Ah..the good ‘ol days!

You can own your very own copy of this cookbook by visiting a partner of ours at her Etsy shop. Buy Now

Bean Dip Recipe

Bean Dip Recipes

Studies show that depressed people often lack B vitamins. Beans deliver a significant dose of these vitamins. What better way to get a good helping of them than in a delicious bean dip? Plus the “to-go-with” possibilities are nearly endless.

kidney-beans

Chili Bean Dip Recipe

Try pinto beans with rice, chickpea hummus on pita bread, or a black bean soup. Source: Secrets to Health and Wellness

Ingredients

Bowl of Fresh Beans for Chili Bean Dip
Bowl of Beans for Chili Bean Dip

1 can (16 ounce) pinto beans or 2 cups cooked dried beans
2 tablespoons chopped onion
1 teaspoon chili powder
1/2 cup shredded cheese

Directions

  1. Mash beans in a bowl.
  2. Add onion and chili powder and shredded cheese.
  3. Serve warm or cold with raw vegetables or tortilla chips.

Serving Size: Serving Size: 2 tablespoons dip
Recipe yields 15 servings of dip.

Per serving

  • Calories 40
  • Total fat 1.5 grams
  • Saturated fat 1 grams
  • Trans fat 0 grams
  • Cholesterol 5 milligrams
  • Sodium 115 milligrams
  • Total Carbohydrate 5 grams
  • Dietary Fiber 1 gram
  • Sugars 0 grams
  • Protein 2 grams

Bean Dip Recipe

Don’t limit beans to just entree dishes or soups, use them for dips, in salads, and dessert!

Ingredients

Bean Dip Recipe
Bean Dip

2 cups canned kidney beans
1 tablespoon vinegar
3/4 teaspoon chili powder
1/8 teaspoon ground cumin
2 teaspoons finely chopped onion
1 cup grated cheddar cheese

Directions

Drain the kidney beans, but save the liquid in a small bowl.

Place the beans, vinegar, chili powder and cumin in a blender. Blend until smooth. Add enough saved bean liquid to make the dip easy to spread.

Stir in the chopped onion and grated cheese.

Store in a tightly covered container and place in the fridge.

Serve with raw vegetable sticks or crackers. You can store this dip in the fridge for up to 4 or 5 days.

Notes: If you don’t have a blender, you can mix the first 4 ingredients in a medium bowl and mash with a fork. Then stir in the onion and cheese.

Serving Size: 1/2 cup. Yield: 6 servings.

Per serving:

  • Calories 150
  • Total fat 7 gram
  • Saturated fat 4 grams
  • Cholesterol 20 milligrams
  • Sodium 410 milligrams
  • Protein: 9 grams

Free PDF Downloads

Would you like to download the recipes? Grab the free PDFs!

Orange Juice or Milk?

Milk Calcium vs. Orange Juice Calcium

Is the calcium  you get from supplements or fortified orange juice absorbed as well as the calcium from milk?  Scientists at Tuft’s Mineral Bioavailability Laboratory say, “Yes”.

The results of an experiment done by Tuft’s showed that blood and urine tests proved that calcium from all three sources was equally absorbed.  This is good news, especially for people who do not like or cannot drink milk. A glass of orange juice can make up for the milk many people get in their  daily morning cereal.

Reduce Dairy Fat with Low Fat Milk

However, it is worthy to note that this doesn’t make the three calcium sources nutritional equals.

Milk, for example, contains protein, vitamin D, vitamin B12, riboflavin and phosphorus. Orange juice has vitamin C and folate. Supplements are great if you need to get calcium, but overall, it is always best to get it in food if possible.

In other words, building a healthful diet is not just about getting enough calcium. It is important to construct and eating plan with a wealth of vitamins and minerals, which is why fruits, vegetables, whole grains, beans, low-fat dairy and other low-fat protein sources should all be figured in.

Since fruits are a favorite among many and rightfully so, how about a very enjoyable, refreshing fruit treat? And since we can’t leave out all-important vegetables, consider the quick recipes below the fruit-sweet treat.

Island Party Kabobs Recipe

Star Fruit  Sweet orange for Orange juice
Mangoes
Bananas
Oranges (but not if too juicy)
Kiwifruit Slices
Assorted Melons

Assemble on kabob sticks and serve.  Chill in the refrigerator before serving for a tasty cooler on a hot summer day.

Veggie UP Tuna or Egg Salad

Let’s not forget our vegetables!

Serve tuna or egg salad a new way by cutting off the top of a hard roll,  hollowing  it out and filling it with the salad. Add fresh onion, tomato and lettuce and put the top back  on. Enjoy.

Chili Bean Pita Pizzas

Black beans, corn, plum tomato and green chilies in a pita. This one packs a wallop of vegetable goodness!

Spread 1/4-cup fat free salsa over two small (6-inch) unopened pitas.  Divide 1/2-cup canned black beans (rinsed and drained), 1/2 cup corn kernels, 1 chopped plum tomato, and 1-tablespoon chopped green chiles between the two pitas.  Top with 1-1/2-ounce 2-percent Monterey Jack cheese.  Bake in a 450-degree oven for eight to ten minutes.

Choose Your Vegetable

Choose Your Vegetable for a Custom Health Boost

All vegetables are healthy. That is pretty well known. But how about you choose your vegetable based on a specific health need?

  • A 1/2-cup serving of carrots is an excellent source of vitamin A, which is important for vision, especially night vision, and for helping maintain healthy skin. Carrots are some of the best things you can munch on for a snack.  Nutritionally, eating carrots raw is fine, but cooking them until they are crisp-tender makes the nutrients more available. This is because carrots have a tough cellular wall that is difficult for the digestive system to break down.
Bunch of fresh carrots
Carrots
  • A 1/2-cup serving of broccoli is a source of vitamins Vitamin A and C. Vitamin C helps maintain healthy gums and teeth and also works with other nutrients to promote healing of cuts. Broccoli that has been cooked still has 15 percent more vitamin C than an orange and as much calcium as milk.
Choose Your Vegetable of Broccoli
Broccoli
  • A 1/2-cup serving of canned tomatoes offers a good source of vitamin C and vitamin A.  In fact, a can of tomatoes is loaded with vitamin C, fiber, potassium and iron. What makes these ruby gems even more special is their rich load of lycopene, which becomes more bio-available to your body when it is cooked.
A single tomato
Tomato

 

  • A 1/2-cup serving of snow peas is a good source of vitamin C and fiber. Fiber helps keep your digestive tract moving smoothly.  Snow peas are a rich source of vitamin C and a source of vitamins A (as beta carotene). They also contain Vitamins B1, and B2. See also: High Fiber Recipes.

 

Snow Peas
Snow Peas

Dried Fruit Nutrition

Dried Fruit Nutrition, Health Benefits and Uses

Dried fruit can be used in so many ways – baked goods, handy snacks, gorps and trail mixes to name a few.

Dried Fruit Nutrition

 

But are you aware of the health benefits in dried fruit nutrition?

Popular Dried Fruit Nutrition Components

  • Raisins. Raisins contain phytochemicals and boron. Phytochemicals benefit oral health by fighting bacteria that cause cavities and gum disease. Boron is beneficial to bone health. Mix raisins with your favorite nuts! You’ll have a high-energy, protein and fiber packed snack. Best of all, it’s a quick and easy homemade snack.
  • Figs. Figs are a high source of dietary fiber and antioxidants. The fiber in figs is associated with improved digestive health. It has also been shown to have anti-clotting, antispasmodic, anti-ulcer and lipid lowering properties.  For the most antioxidants, choose fully ripened figs. Research conducted at the University of Innsbruck in Austria suggests that as they ripen, almost to the point of spoilage, antioxidant levels actually increase.
  • Apricots. Apricots are rich in carotenoids like beta-carotene. Beta-carotene is important for healthy eyes, skin, and a strong immune system. Apricots are low in  calories, too. Three medium apricots contain about 50 calories.
  • Prunes. Prunes are rich in phenolic compounds. The phenolic compounds in prunes promote bone health. Prunes are also a good source of potassium. These qualities make prunes an excellent snack for active people.
  • Dates. Dates are high in antioxidants and proanthocyanidins. Antioxidants protect cells against free radicals. Proanthocyanidin compounds are strongly associated with cardiovascular health. Here in the U.S., dates are added to pudding, breads, spreads, and even sparkling date juices.
  • Peaches. Peaches are an excellent source of vitamin A. Vitamin A is important for the retina and in maintaining healthy eyes.

Dried Fruit Nutrition Chart

Click image for a larger view.

Dried Fruit Nutrition Chart

You may also like…

  1. Dried Fruit Salad Recipe
  2. Fruit Candy Recipes
  3. Gluten Free Nut and Seed Muesli
  4. Chopping Dried Fruit (Cooking Tip)

Chia Gel Adds Nutrients

Chia Gel Adds Nutrients in Your Favorite Foods

Chia gel is a quick, easy staple you can whip up at home and store in your fridge. With a supply of chia gel at the ready, it is a cinch to increase nutrients in your favorite foods.

Add chia gel to creamy foods, liquids, condiments, salad dressings, and even peanut butter and jelly. The gel doesn’t affect flavors. What it does is increase a food’s vitamin and mineral levels, and add protein and omega fatty acids. It also promotes weight loss by filling your stomach with fiber. Following is one way to make chia gel.

Chia: A Non GMO Food

If a food is labeled as GMO it means that its genetic material has been altered through genetic engineering. According to the National Agriculture Statistics Board annual report for 2010, 93 percent of the planted area of soybeans, 93 percent of cotton, 86 percent of corn, and 95 percent of sugar  beets in the United States were genetically modified varieties.

Chia gel adds nutrients
Chia gel adds nutrients

First, you will need chia seeds. You can probably find them at health food stores or even some grocery stores. We recommend Digestive Science Organic Chia Seed.

Chia Digestive Science
Let’s look at the numbers. Twenty-seven PLUS nutrients. Six times more calcium than milk. Forty one percent of your daily fiber, and 100 percent more Omega-3 fatty acids than salmon. The cost in calories? Forty one and a quarter, per tablespoon. Can’t be beat.

Chia gel adds nutrients. Chia is low in calories. Win-win.

The health benefits of Digestive Science Organic Chia Seed are numerous and extensive. That’s why we recommend it.

Making Chia Gel

Chia gel: Take 1-cup cool water and 1-1/2 tablespoons chia seeds. Pour the water into a plastic or glass container with a tight seal. Slowly pour chia seeds into water while briskly mixing with wire whisk. Wait 3 or 4 minutes then whisk again. Let the mixture stand about 10 minutes before whisking again. Seal the container and store mixture in the refrigerator for up to two weeks to use as needed. Whisk before using.

Note: Soaking in water will soften chia seeds, but they will still be slightly crunchy. Recipe makes 1-1/4 cup.

Where Chia Gel Adds Nutrients

Chia gel adds nutrients to almost any condiment, dip, or spread. Do experiment! To get started, here are some ideas.

  • Nut butter. Add up to 1 tablespoon chia gel for every tablespoon nut butter.
  • Jam or jelly. Add 1 teaspoon chia gel for every tablespoon jam or jelly.
  • Maple syrup or honey. Add 1 teaspoon chia gel for every tablespoon of syrup.
  • Mayonnaise. Add up to 1 tablespoon chia gel for every tablespoon mayonnaise.
  • Mustard. Add up to 1 tablespoon chia gel for every tablespoon mustard.
  • Ketchup and cocktail sauce. Add 1 teaspoon chia gel for every tablespoon ketchup or cocktail sauce.
  • Barbecue sauce. Add 1 teaspoon chia gel for every tablespoon barbecue sauce.
  • Guacamole. Add1/2½ tablespoon chia gel for every tablespoon of guacamole.
  • Hummus and other bean dips. Add 1 tablespoon chia gel for every tablespoon hummus.
  • Salsa. Add 1 teaspoon chia gel for every tablespoon salsa.
  • Salad dressing. Add 1 tablespoon chia gel for every tablespoon salad dressing.
  • Sour cream. Add 1 tablespoon chia gel for every tablespoon sour cream.

On a Weight Loss Program?

If you are already on any established weight loss program, chia can be just what you need to ensure success. Simply adding chia to what you are already eating can help fill you up. Chia creates a feeling of satiety so you won’t eat more than you need.  It also helps regulate blood sugar levels.

Using Raisins in Foods

Using Raisins in Cooking and Baking

Available year round, using raisins in a wide variety of foods is easy. Cereals, breads, cookies, candies and energy snacks are just a few examples. The raisin is truly one of the world’s most versatile food ingredients.

Raisins are low in fat and sodium, but high in carbohydrates for a quick pick- me-up snack. Raisins are also high in antioxidants and cholesterol free. One-quarter cup of dried uncooked raisins provides 1 serving from the fruit group of the Food Guide Pyramid.

Raisins in Baked Goods

Raisins provide more than just flavor to the cereals and baked goods. Using raisins, bakers can reduce or even eliminate the use of preservatives. This is because of the propionic acid found in raisins. It acts as a natural preservative.

Another naturally occurring acid in raisins, tartaric acid, enhances the flavor of baked goods. Tartaric acid can also help reduce
the amount of salt needed to flavor breads, cakes, cookies, and pastries.

Chocolate Raisins

Confectionery items that use raisins include the following.Using raisins for chocolate covered raisins

  • Yogurt covered raisins.
  • Chocolate bars with raisins.
  • Chocolate covered raisins.

Barbecue and Steak Sauce

Raisins add flavor and texture to foods. Raisin juice concentrate and raisin paste are flavor enhancers. You can find them in everything from breads, cakes and cookies to barbecue and steak sauces.

Many popular barbecue and steak sauce brands combine raisin paste and raisin juice concentrate with ingredients such as tomato paste, soy sauce, and vinegar. This helps create a wide selection of bold sauces.

More Foods for Raisins

  1. Granola Bars
  2. Raisin Stuffing
  3. Bread Pudding
  4. Classic Coleslaw
  5. Celery Sticks
  6. Salads

Did you know?

Raisins should be stored in the refrigerator to keep them soft and moist.

Actually, the ways of using raisins in your cooking and baking are seemingly endless. Use your imagination! You can also get some terrific recipes from the Sun Maid web site.

Top 15 Sun Maid Recipes
Top 15 Sun Maid Recipes

Resource: Raisins and Dried Fruits Publication from Sun Maid

Go Green with Broccoli Pops

Go Green with Broccoli Pops

Eating frozen vegetables? Well, yes! In fact, through many a discussion with mothers it was discovered some could get their kids to eat vegetables this way.

In short, nutritious broccoli pops are probably one of those things you have to try to see if it holds appeal for you.

Broccoli Pops
Broccoli Pops

Getting Started

First of all, to get the best results, make sure your broccoli is fresh and crisp. Old broccoli, which is usually limp, will make nasty-tasting broccoli pops. The best quality broccoli are those that are tight, before the florets start to open and turn a yellow color.

You’ll want to choose firm, young and tender stalks with compact heads. Split your flowerets lengthwise so they are no more than 1-1/2 inches across. And don’t forget to remove leaves and woody portions. Separate the broccoli heads into bite-size portions.

Prepare the Broccoli

Soak the broccoli in brine for 30 minutes to remove insects. Then rinse under fast running water. For the brine, you use 4 teaspoons salt to 1 gallon ordinary tap water.

Blanch the broccoli. Blanch the broccoli with steam for 5 minutes. This kills bacteria. If you are preparing a lot of broccoli, you may use the same blanching water several times (up to 5). Be sure to add more hot water from the tap from time to time to keep the water level at the required height.

Immediately cool broccoli in ice water and then drain thoroughly. Now you can drop pieces of your prepared broccoli into Popsicle molds and freeze! If you wish, you could puree the broccoli and place tightly (think packed brown sugar) into Popsicle molds. This option depends upon whether you want to A) do the extra work and B) want broccoli pops that melt in your mouth or need some chewing action.

Once your broccoli pops are frozen solid, remove them from the Popsicle molds and place into freezer bags or containers for best storage. They can easily get freezer burned if left in the molds.

The recommended storage time for frozen broccoli pops is 12 months for best for taste and quality. For the absolute BEST storage, be sure to get rid of any air from inside your freezer bags or containers. This will help avoid freezer burn. Vacuum-sealed bags are great for long term storage. A most popular tool for vacuum sealing (many, MANY uses) is the FoodSaver Vacuum Sealing System.

With its sleek, compact design and easy-to-use manual operation, the FoodSaver V2244 vacuum sealing system comes in handy for preserving a variety of foods. Use it for everything from long-term storage of meats and fish in the freezer to short-term storage of deli meats and cheese in the fridge, as well as cookies, crackers, and other snacks in the pantry.

Bonus Recipe:  Sweet Broccoli Salad

Like broccoli but not sure you’d care to eat it as a frozen treat? Give this salad recipe a try, instead! A delicious way to get raw broccoli into your diet. 

1 head of broccoli, chopped finely Salad Clip art
1 carrot, grated
2 apples, cored and chopped
1 cup raisins (Soak in water 1/3 hour before using. Drain and discard water.)
1/4 cup raw, unsalted sunflower seeds

Mix all the above  ingredients together.

Dressing:
1/2 cup extra-virgin oil
1 tablespoon unpasteurized apple cider vinegar
1 tablespoon unpasteurized honey

Mix the dressing ingredients together. Pour on vegetable mixture. Toss and enjoy.

Did you know?

Broccoli is the superhero of the vegetable kingdom with its rich vitamin A content.

Super Fruits Acai, Apricots and Avocados

Super Fruits Acai, Apricots and Avocados

In our first in a series of fruit frenzy posts, we will take a quick look at three super fruits – acai, apricots and avocados and their health benefits.

Click each image below for a larger view of the super fruits.

[one_third last=”no”]Acai berries thumbnail[/one_third]

[one_third last=”no”]Apricots thumbnail[/one_third]

[one_third last=”yes”]Avocado thumbnail[/one_third]

Acai Berries


Super foods are those foods that do such things as lower cholesterol and blood pressure. The acai berry is now one of those foods.

  • Acai berries provide energy to our bodies. This helps us keep moving.
  • Acai berries help you lose weight faster.
  • Acai berries can lower your cholesterol.
  • Acai berries can lower your blood pressure.
  • Acai berries help prevent several serious diseases like heart disease.

Apricots

  • Apricots are a good source of vitamin A. Vitamin A helps protect vision.
  • Apricots are a good source of vitamin C.
  • Three medium apricots contain about 50 calories. This makes them a great low calorie snack.
  • The beta-carotene in apricots may provide heart benefits.

Avocados

  • Avocados are sodium and cholesterol free.
  • Avocados contain omega-3 fatty acids.
  • Avocados are a good source of vitamin K and vitamin C.
  • Avocados are  a good source of beta-carotene.

Avocado Caution

Individuals with latex allergies should limit their avocado consumption or avoid it completely. Unfortunately, the fruit contains high amounts of chitinase enzymes. These enzymes are associated with latex allergies. Lightly cooking the food slightly deactivates these enzymes.

Super Fruits: Persistent Point

All fruits are healthy for us, but the best ones are those with the most fiber. A good rule of thumb is to stick with the “S or S” fruits. These are the ones with edible skins or seeds.  Fruits included are apples, peaches, pears, blueberries, strawberries, blackberries, and grapes.

Eating the skin and seeds amps up your fiber intake. The skin and the seeds contain most of the antioxidants, vitamins, and minerals. That’s why it’s much better to eat whole fruit, rather than relying on juices.