Camper Meal Planning

Camper Meal Planning

Eating outdoors is half the fun of camping, but it takes some planning. Consider not only the weight and bulk of the food you carry but also its caloric content (hauling a pack may burn 3,200 to 3,800 calories per day, more than twice what’s needed to swing in a hammock).

Camping Tent
Camping Tent

Also consider store-ability. Among the foods that won’t spoil if left UN-refrigerated for a few days are hard cheese, hard salami, jerky, sliced carrots and celery, margarine, frozen bagels, and pita bread.

Try new camping foods at home; a campsite is a poor place to discover than an anticipated delight tastes more like sawdust.

Plan major meals in advance and pack all the ingredients in double plastic bags for extra protection. Use color codes to distinguish breakfasts, lunches, and dinners. Place colored paper between the inner and outer bags or mark the bags with indelible pens.

If you are tenting, anticipate rainy days when you won’t want to cook outside. Take along a few one pot add-hot-water dinners to heat at the tent door. For cold, rainy mornings, fix a breakfast that doesn’t need cooking. Dried fruit, rich breads, cheese and smoked fish.

Camp Baking

Cherry Cupcake
Cherry Cupcake

Camper meal planning needs to include sweets, right? Indeed! An inexpensive 1-1/2 quart ring mold (for gelatin) and a camp stove can be used to bake quick breads and biscuits. Mix the dry ingredients in a plastic bag at home. Add water in camp; hold the bag shut and mix the contents by squeezing and kneading. Slit the bag slightly and squeeze the batter into the greased mold.

Set the mold on the stove, centering its hole over the burner to avoid burning the dough’s edges adjust the stove to the smallest possible blue flame. Cover with an upside down frying pan or aluminum plate.

If your stove produces only a wide spreading flame, nestle the ring mold inside another of the same size to distribute the heat more evenly. If wind keeps blowing the flame to the side, rotate the stove often.

Baking time depends on elevation but averages 80 percent of the baking time for a package mix. Longer if you remove the cover often to check progress.

See also: Cherry S’mores Recipe

Camp Cooking

camper-meal-planning
Camper Meal Planning

For the camper meal planning, know that a lightweight camp stove is faster, cleaner and easier to cook with than a fire. It also causes less wear and tear on the landscape. If you do use a fire, spread the coals out for low, easily controlled heat.

You can devise cooking pots from 1, 2 and 3 pound coffee cans that nest inside each other. Pack pliers to lift the hot cans.

Supermarkets sell many freeze dried foods at about half the prices charged by camping stores. Combine instant macaroni, noodles, or rice with instant soup mix for a satisfying camp meal. Other standbys, such as powdered fruit drinks, instant potatoes, individual oatmeal packets, spaghetti dinners, and puddings work well too.

Remember that freeze dried meat needs more cooking than other ingredients. Place the meat in cold water (20 percent more than the instructions call for) and bring to a boil; then add spices, if called for. Continue boiling for five minutes before adding other ingredients.

Because water boils at lower temperatures in high elevations (about 1 degree per 500 feet), you must boil foods longer. Experiment with cooking times.

Cooking with a stove inside a tent can cause headache, nausea, dizziness or even death from carbon monoxide. In bad weather set the stove just outside the tent door under the rain-fly overhang while cooking from inside the tent. Some tents are designed with vestibules for this purpose.

Caution: Always refuel a stove outside the tent and away from all open flames. And don’t ever throw used fuel containers in the fire.

Do also check out our Digitized Vintage Camping Recipe e-Book on Etsy!

Food Storage for Camper Meal Planning

  • Remove powdered foods from their original containers and re-package small quantities in double plastic bags. Between the two layers, slip in an identification label and the mixing instructions.
  • Transfer spices from large containers into clean prescription bottles or plastic film canisters. Label the containers and lids.
  • To protect eggs, carry them in a container filled with pancake mix or flour.
  • Snowbanks provide cool storage. Put food in secure containers and bury it deeply.
  • A stream can serve as a refrigerator. Put the food in well anchored waterproof bags.

How About Packing Up Some Healthful Gorp?

Check out all our healthy and satisfying Gorp Recipes from our sister site, BellyBytes.com.

Study Tips to Train the Brain

Study Tips to Train the Brain

Study Tips
Study Tips

Let’s take a look at some quick study tips that will help you train your brain for all your studies throughout the school year and beyond!

  1. Brains don’t run on hot air. Eat breakfast.
  2. Pay attention, don’t get attention. Listen in class.
  3. Every new word deserves ink. Write facts, words and questions in a notebook.
  4. Write down assignments, every word. No shortcuts!
  5. Use down time during the day to read, write or do a math problem. You might be through home work before school is out.
  6. Get team study spirit! Have a study partner who helps you with one subject and whom you can help with another.
  7. Stiff necks not allowed! Put books and papers where you can read and write comfortably.
  8. Yaawwwwn at home, not in school! Relax between classes. Stretch and roll your shoulders and wiggle your feet.
  9. Snack time! Everybody feels a little tired about 3 or 4 in the afternoon. Just don’t spoil your appetite for supper.

Speaking of snack time, following is a recipe for Pennant Cookies. A great treat after the big game win and a great comfort after a big loss…

Pennant Cookies Recipe

Great for the bake sale!

1 (18 ounce) package sugar cookie dough
Craft sticks
1 (16 ounce) container white frosting
Food coloring
1 bag M & Ms milk chocolate candies

  1. Roll out sugar cookie dough and cutout triangle shapes.
  2. Add a craft stick to the back of each cookie and adhere with a small ball of additional cookie dough.
  3. Bake according to package directions and let cool.
  4. Tint frosting to school colors and decorate with M & Ms candies.
Pennant Cookies
Pennant Cookies

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Camping Breakfast Recipes

Camping Breakfast Recipes

Camping season is almost upon us! For die-hard campers, it never really ends. Following are some delicious recipes to fuel you up for your busy outdoor camping excursions.

Camping Breakfast Recipes

Delicious & Hearty Camping Breakfast Recipes

Campfire Eggs

On a 3-day camping trips? Save the remainder of the bacon from these camping breakfast recipes for the next day’s breakfast.

Ingredients:
8 slices bacon
1-1/2 cups frozen hash browns
Sweet onion
Salt and pepper to taste
6 eggs or 1-1/2 cup liquid egg substitute
1/3 cup milk
1/4 teaspoon salt
1/2 cup shredded Cheddar or Colby cheese

Farm Fresh Eggs
Farm Fresh Eggs

Directions

  1. Cook bacon in heavy skillet until crisp. Remove and crumble bacon. Pour off all but 2 tablespoons fat.
  2. Slice as much onion as your family likes very thin. Add to the pan with the potatoes. Sprinkle with salt and pepper to taste.
  3. Return to heat and fry until potatoes are lightly browned.
  4. Beat together eggs, milk, 1/4 teaspoon salt and pepper. Pour over browned potatoes in skillet.
  5. Cook without stirring until mixture begins to set. Using a spatula, lift and fold partially cooked eggs so uncooked egg flows underneath. Continue cooking for about 4 minutes until cooked but not dry.
  6. Arrange crumbled bacon on top, sprinkle with cheese.

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Breakfast Tortilla Wraps

Ingredients:
1 tablespoon butter
Eggs
Milk
Cheddar Cheese or American Cheese
Bacon
Large flour tortillas

Directions

  1. Beat your eggs together with a small amount of milk.
  2. Melt butter in pan or spray with cooking spray, and add eggs.
  3. In another pan fry your bacon in strips and drain.
  4. After the eggs are cooked, add a spoonful or two to each tortillas, some  cheese and a strip or two of bacon.
  5. Roll up the tortillas and eat!

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Sausage on a Stick

Ingredients:
1 12-ounce package fully cooked smoked sausage links
1 package refrigerated bread sticks

Directions

Spear sausage on stick or hotdog fork. Coil one bread stick dough around each sausage link, pinching ends. Rotate slowly until bread is browned.

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Pineapple or Apple Pancakes

Ingredients:
8 slices canned pineapple
2 large apples
Complete pancake mix (using water)
Syrup

Directions

  1. Mix up your batch of pancake mix according to the directions and prepare as usual.
  2. Place one slice pineapple slice OR sliced apples on pan or griddle.
  3. Pour 1/4 cup batter over slice. Cook on the first side until it starts to bubble on top, then flip and brown the other side.
  4. Serve with syrup or sprinkle with cinnamon sugar mixture. This is especially good when using apples.

Download Recipes in PDF

Camping Breakfast Recipes
Camping Breakfast Recipes

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May all your camping days be filled with sunshine!
May all your camping days be filled with sunshine!

Choose Your Vegetable

Choose Your Vegetable for a Custom Health Boost

All vegetables are healthy. That is pretty well known. But how about you choose your vegetable based on a specific health need?

  • A 1/2-cup serving of carrots is an excellent source of vitamin A, which is important for vision, especially night vision, and for helping maintain healthy skin. Carrots are some of the best things you can munch on for a snack.  Nutritionally, eating carrots raw is fine, but cooking them until they are crisp-tender makes the nutrients more available. This is because carrots have a tough cellular wall that is difficult for the digestive system to break down.
Bunch of fresh carrots
Carrots
  • A 1/2-cup serving of broccoli is a source of vitamins Vitamin A and C. Vitamin C helps maintain healthy gums and teeth and also works with other nutrients to promote healing of cuts. Broccoli that has been cooked still has 15 percent more vitamin C than an orange and as much calcium as milk.
Choose Your Vegetable of Broccoli
Broccoli
  • A 1/2-cup serving of canned tomatoes offers a good source of vitamin C and vitamin A.  In fact, a can of tomatoes is loaded with vitamin C, fiber, potassium and iron. What makes these ruby gems even more special is their rich load of lycopene, which becomes more bio-available to your body when it is cooked.
A single tomato
Tomato

 

  • A 1/2-cup serving of snow peas is a good source of vitamin C and fiber. Fiber helps keep your digestive tract moving smoothly.  Snow peas are a rich source of vitamin C and a source of vitamins A (as beta carotene). They also contain Vitamins B1, and B2. See also: High Fiber Recipes.

 

Snow Peas
Snow Peas

Dried Fruit Nutrition

Dried Fruit Nutrition, Health Benefits and Uses

Dried fruit can be used in so many ways – baked goods, handy snacks, gorps and trail mixes to name a few.

Dried Fruit Nutrition

 

But are you aware of the health benefits in dried fruit nutrition?

Popular Dried Fruit Nutrition Components

  • Raisins. Raisins contain phytochemicals and boron. Phytochemicals benefit oral health by fighting bacteria that cause cavities and gum disease. Boron is beneficial to bone health. Mix raisins with your favorite nuts! You’ll have a high-energy, protein and fiber packed snack. Best of all, it’s a quick and easy homemade snack.
  • Figs. Figs are a high source of dietary fiber and antioxidants. The fiber in figs is associated with improved digestive health. It has also been shown to have anti-clotting, antispasmodic, anti-ulcer and lipid lowering properties.  For the most antioxidants, choose fully ripened figs. Research conducted at the University of Innsbruck in Austria suggests that as they ripen, almost to the point of spoilage, antioxidant levels actually increase.
  • Apricots. Apricots are rich in carotenoids like beta-carotene. Beta-carotene is important for healthy eyes, skin, and a strong immune system. Apricots are low in  calories, too. Three medium apricots contain about 50 calories.
  • Prunes. Prunes are rich in phenolic compounds. The phenolic compounds in prunes promote bone health. Prunes are also a good source of potassium. These qualities make prunes an excellent snack for active people.
  • Dates. Dates are high in antioxidants and proanthocyanidins. Antioxidants protect cells against free radicals. Proanthocyanidin compounds are strongly associated with cardiovascular health. Here in the U.S., dates are added to pudding, breads, spreads, and even sparkling date juices.
  • Peaches. Peaches are an excellent source of vitamin A. Vitamin A is important for the retina and in maintaining healthy eyes.

Dried Fruit Nutrition Chart

Click image for a larger view.

Dried Fruit Nutrition Chart

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  1. Dried Fruit Salad Recipe
  2. Fruit Candy Recipes
  3. Gluten Free Nut and Seed Muesli
  4. Chopping Dried Fruit (Cooking Tip)

Bearberries Blackberries

Bearberries, Blackberries – More Super Fruits

In our third in a series of fruit frenzy favorites we will take a look at two more super fruits, bearberries blackberries and  their health benefits. (Click the thumbnails below for a large view of the berries.)


[one_half last=”no”]Bearberries thumb for bearberries blackberries post[/one_half]
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Bearberries

Bearberry Fruit
Bearberries

Bearberry is used for bladder treatment in European folk medicine. Hydroquinones found in the bearberry leaves have antibacterial properties that aid infections.

A cup of bearberry tea, made from the dried leaves infused in boiling water, can help with urinary infections, kidney and bladder problems and prostate disorders.

Bearberry Tea

To make a cup of bearberry tea use 1 to 2 teaspoons of the dried leaves for every 1 cup of boiling water. Infuse the leaves for ten to fifteen minutes, covered. Strain and drink. When treating infections or other problems with the urinary system you can drink up to three cups a day of this herbal infusion.

Bearberry Leaves

Bearberry leaves can  be smoked to get rid of headache. However, using bearberry in this form is illegal and is carefully regulated in many parts of the world, as it has a narcotic effect.

Bearberry nutritional value can be obtained by consuming it raw.

Blackberries

Blackberries
Fresh Blackberries

Blackberry fruit contains vast amounts of anthocyanocides, which are found in the pigment that gives the berries their color. Anthocyanocides are powerful antioxidants. Give an antioxidant packed boost to your next fruit smoothie with blackberries.

Blackberry Leaves

Blackberry leaves are said to treat non-specific diarrhea and inflammation of the mouth and throat. The leaves are also said to reduce blood sugar. The leaves contain good amounts of vitamins C and E along with the mineral selenium.

Blackberry Tea

Use 1 generous tablespoon of dried blackberry tea leaves per cup of boiling water. Cover and steep for 10 minutes. Strain. Add honey or sugar to taste. You can combine equal amounts of dried mint and dried blackberry tea leaves as a combination.

All BerriesMixed fresh berries

  • Are low in sodium, fat and cholesterol free.
  • An excellent source of fiber, potassium and vitamin C.
  • Support heart health, normal blood pressure and weight loss.

Super Fruits: Persistent Point

All fruits are healthy for us, but the best ones are those with the most fiber. A good rule of thumb is to stick with the “S or S” fruits. These are the ones with edible skins or seeds. Fruits included are apples, peaches, pears, blueberries, strawberries, blackberries, and grapes. Eating the skin and seeds amps up your fiber intake. The skin and the seeds contain most of the antioxidants, vitamins, and minerals.

That’s why it’s much better to eat whole fruit, rather than relying on juices.

See also: A tasty recipe for Blackberry Syrup on our sister site, Belly Bytes.

First two fruit frenzy posts:

  1. Super Fruits Acai, Apricots and Avocados
  2. Blood Oranges and Bananas

Chia Gel Adds Nutrients

Chia Gel Adds Nutrients in Your Favorite Foods

Chia gel is a quick, easy staple you can whip up at home and store in your fridge. With a supply of chia gel at the ready, it is a cinch to increase nutrients in your favorite foods.

Add chia gel to creamy foods, liquids, condiments, salad dressings, and even peanut butter and jelly. The gel doesn’t affect flavors. What it does is increase a food’s vitamin and mineral levels, and add protein and omega fatty acids. It also promotes weight loss by filling your stomach with fiber. Following is one way to make chia gel.

Chia: A Non GMO Food

If a food is labeled as GMO it means that its genetic material has been altered through genetic engineering. According to the National Agriculture Statistics Board annual report for 2010, 93 percent of the planted area of soybeans, 93 percent of cotton, 86 percent of corn, and 95 percent of sugar  beets in the United States were genetically modified varieties.

Chia gel adds nutrients
Chia gel adds nutrients

First, you will need chia seeds. You can probably find them at health food stores or even some grocery stores. We recommend Digestive Science Organic Chia Seed.

Chia Digestive Science
Let’s look at the numbers. Twenty-seven PLUS nutrients. Six times more calcium than milk. Forty one percent of your daily fiber, and 100 percent more Omega-3 fatty acids than salmon. The cost in calories? Forty one and a quarter, per tablespoon. Can’t be beat.

Chia gel adds nutrients. Chia is low in calories. Win-win.

The health benefits of Digestive Science Organic Chia Seed are numerous and extensive. That’s why we recommend it.

Making Chia Gel

Chia gel: Take 1-cup cool water and 1-1/2 tablespoons chia seeds. Pour the water into a plastic or glass container with a tight seal. Slowly pour chia seeds into water while briskly mixing with wire whisk. Wait 3 or 4 minutes then whisk again. Let the mixture stand about 10 minutes before whisking again. Seal the container and store mixture in the refrigerator for up to two weeks to use as needed. Whisk before using.

Note: Soaking in water will soften chia seeds, but they will still be slightly crunchy. Recipe makes 1-1/4 cup.

Where Chia Gel Adds Nutrients

Chia gel adds nutrients to almost any condiment, dip, or spread. Do experiment! To get started, here are some ideas.

  • Nut butter. Add up to 1 tablespoon chia gel for every tablespoon nut butter.
  • Jam or jelly. Add 1 teaspoon chia gel for every tablespoon jam or jelly.
  • Maple syrup or honey. Add 1 teaspoon chia gel for every tablespoon of syrup.
  • Mayonnaise. Add up to 1 tablespoon chia gel for every tablespoon mayonnaise.
  • Mustard. Add up to 1 tablespoon chia gel for every tablespoon mustard.
  • Ketchup and cocktail sauce. Add 1 teaspoon chia gel for every tablespoon ketchup or cocktail sauce.
  • Barbecue sauce. Add 1 teaspoon chia gel for every tablespoon barbecue sauce.
  • Guacamole. Add1/2½ tablespoon chia gel for every tablespoon of guacamole.
  • Hummus and other bean dips. Add 1 tablespoon chia gel for every tablespoon hummus.
  • Salsa. Add 1 teaspoon chia gel for every tablespoon salsa.
  • Salad dressing. Add 1 tablespoon chia gel for every tablespoon salad dressing.
  • Sour cream. Add 1 tablespoon chia gel for every tablespoon sour cream.

On a Weight Loss Program?

If you are already on any established weight loss program, chia can be just what you need to ensure success. Simply adding chia to what you are already eating can help fill you up. Chia creates a feeling of satiety so you won’t eat more than you need.  It also helps regulate blood sugar levels.

Using Raisins in Foods

Using Raisins in Cooking and Baking

Available year round, using raisins in a wide variety of foods is easy. Cereals, breads, cookies, candies and energy snacks are just a few examples. The raisin is truly one of the world’s most versatile food ingredients.

Raisins are low in fat and sodium, but high in carbohydrates for a quick pick- me-up snack. Raisins are also high in antioxidants and cholesterol free. One-quarter cup of dried uncooked raisins provides 1 serving from the fruit group of the Food Guide Pyramid.

Raisins in Baked Goods

Raisins provide more than just flavor to the cereals and baked goods. Using raisins, bakers can reduce or even eliminate the use of preservatives. This is because of the propionic acid found in raisins. It acts as a natural preservative.

Another naturally occurring acid in raisins, tartaric acid, enhances the flavor of baked goods. Tartaric acid can also help reduce
the amount of salt needed to flavor breads, cakes, cookies, and pastries.

Chocolate Raisins

Confectionery items that use raisins include the following.Using raisins for chocolate covered raisins

  • Yogurt covered raisins.
  • Chocolate bars with raisins.
  • Chocolate covered raisins.

Barbecue and Steak Sauce

Raisins add flavor and texture to foods. Raisin juice concentrate and raisin paste are flavor enhancers. You can find them in everything from breads, cakes and cookies to barbecue and steak sauces.

Many popular barbecue and steak sauce brands combine raisin paste and raisin juice concentrate with ingredients such as tomato paste, soy sauce, and vinegar. This helps create a wide selection of bold sauces.

More Foods for Raisins

  1. Granola Bars
  2. Raisin Stuffing
  3. Bread Pudding
  4. Classic Coleslaw
  5. Celery Sticks
  6. Salads

Did you know?

Raisins should be stored in the refrigerator to keep them soft and moist.

Actually, the ways of using raisins in your cooking and baking are seemingly endless. Use your imagination! You can also get some terrific recipes from the Sun Maid web site.

Top 15 Sun Maid Recipes
Top 15 Sun Maid Recipes

Resource: Raisins and Dried Fruits Publication from Sun Maid

Blood Oranges and Bananas

Blood Oranges and Bananas: Super Fruits

In our second in a series of fruit frenzy favorites we will take a look at beloved bananas and the succulent but less common blood oranges.

Click each image below for a larger view of the super fruits.

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Bananas

If you want a quick fix for flagging energy levels, there is no better snack than a banana. Research has proven that just 2 bananas provide enough energy for a strenuous 90-minute workout. But energy isn’t the only way a banana can help us keep fit. It can also help overcome or prevent a substantial number of illnesses and conditions making it a must to add to your daily diet. See: The Power Behind Bananas

Blood Oranges

Also called pigmented orange or moro orange, good-quality blood oranges should be firm and heavy for their size. It is the crimson tint that makes blood oranges healthy.

Blood oranges are very low in saturated fat, cholesterol and sodium. They are also a good source of dietary fiber, and a very good source of Vitamin C. They have the added benefit of anthocyanins, too. One of these oranges packs around eighty calories.

Eat blood oranges out of hand or juice them in salads. They are great for juicing due to the flavor and coloring.

Blood Oranges Cocktail Recipe

Blood Orange Cocktail
Blood Orange Cocktail

3 ounces of blood orange juice
1 ounce of vodka or white rum
Ice

  1. Put all the ingredients into a cocktail shaker filled with ice.
  2. Shake well.
  3. Put the combination in glass.
  4. Drink and enjoy!

Super Fruits: Persistent Point

All fruits are healthy for us, but the best ones are those with the most fiber. A good rule of thumb is to stick with the “S or S” fruits. These are the ones with edible skins or seeds. Fruits included are apples, peaches, pears, blueberries, strawberries, blackberries, and grapes.Eating the skin and seeds amps up your fiber intake. The skin and the seeds contain most of the antioxidants, vitamins, and minerals.

That’s why it’s much better to eat whole fruit, rather than relying on juices.

Previous Fruit Frenzy Posts

Go Green with Broccoli Pops

Go Green with Broccoli Pops

Eating frozen vegetables? Well, yes! In fact, through many a discussion with mothers it was discovered some could get their kids to eat vegetables this way.

In short, nutritious broccoli pops are probably one of those things you have to try to see if it holds appeal for you.

Broccoli Pops
Broccoli Pops

Getting Started

First of all, to get the best results, make sure your broccoli is fresh and crisp. Old broccoli, which is usually limp, will make nasty-tasting broccoli pops. The best quality broccoli are those that are tight, before the florets start to open and turn a yellow color.

You’ll want to choose firm, young and tender stalks with compact heads. Split your flowerets lengthwise so they are no more than 1-1/2 inches across. And don’t forget to remove leaves and woody portions. Separate the broccoli heads into bite-size portions.

Prepare the Broccoli

Soak the broccoli in brine for 30 minutes to remove insects. Then rinse under fast running water. For the brine, you use 4 teaspoons salt to 1 gallon ordinary tap water.

Blanch the broccoli. Blanch the broccoli with steam for 5 minutes. This kills bacteria. If you are preparing a lot of broccoli, you may use the same blanching water several times (up to 5). Be sure to add more hot water from the tap from time to time to keep the water level at the required height.

Immediately cool broccoli in ice water and then drain thoroughly. Now you can drop pieces of your prepared broccoli into Popsicle molds and freeze! If you wish, you could puree the broccoli and place tightly (think packed brown sugar) into Popsicle molds. This option depends upon whether you want to A) do the extra work and B) want broccoli pops that melt in your mouth or need some chewing action.

Once your broccoli pops are frozen solid, remove them from the Popsicle molds and place into freezer bags or containers for best storage. They can easily get freezer burned if left in the molds.

The recommended storage time for frozen broccoli pops is 12 months for best for taste and quality. For the absolute BEST storage, be sure to get rid of any air from inside your freezer bags or containers. This will help avoid freezer burn. Vacuum-sealed bags are great for long term storage. A most popular tool for vacuum sealing (many, MANY uses) is the FoodSaver Vacuum Sealing System.

With its sleek, compact design and easy-to-use manual operation, the FoodSaver V2244 vacuum sealing system comes in handy for preserving a variety of foods. Use it for everything from long-term storage of meats and fish in the freezer to short-term storage of deli meats and cheese in the fridge, as well as cookies, crackers, and other snacks in the pantry.

Bonus Recipe:  Sweet Broccoli Salad

Like broccoli but not sure you’d care to eat it as a frozen treat? Give this salad recipe a try, instead! A delicious way to get raw broccoli into your diet. 

1 head of broccoli, chopped finely Salad Clip art
1 carrot, grated
2 apples, cored and chopped
1 cup raisins (Soak in water 1/3 hour before using. Drain and discard water.)
1/4 cup raw, unsalted sunflower seeds

Mix all the above  ingredients together.

Dressing:
1/2 cup extra-virgin oil
1 tablespoon unpasteurized apple cider vinegar
1 tablespoon unpasteurized honey

Mix the dressing ingredients together. Pour on vegetable mixture. Toss and enjoy.

Did you know?

Broccoli is the superhero of the vegetable kingdom with its rich vitamin A content.