Berry Crumble Pie Recipe

Berry Crumble Pie Recipe

This berry crumble pie recipe comes from a very popular restaurant and is in demand all year long by its customers. A long standing favorite!

One satiated customer said, “This was by far the best dessert I have ever eaten and my obsession to eat every crumb could easily have been mistaken for an eating disorder!”

This pie features raspberries; however, you could use any favorite pie berry such as blueberries, strawberries, etc. We’ve been given permission to share it with one and all – hope you enjoy!
Ripe raspberries for Berry Crumble Pie Recipe

The Satiating Berry Crumble Pie Recipe

Ingredients:
1 -1/3 cups (2-2/3 sticks) unsalted butter, room temperatureRaspberry trio
2/3-cup sugar plus 1-1/2 to 3 cups of sugar, depending on sweetness of berries (divided)
1 egg
1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon baking powder
3-1/2 cups flour
Almond Streusel (see recipe below)
6 cups (3 pints) raspberries – pick over but do not rinse (see note)
1/2 cup cornstarch
1 tablespoon vanilla extract
12 small disposable pie tins (see note)
Directions:

  • Cream butter and 2/3 cup sugar until well mixed. Add egg and vanilla, scraping with a rubber scraper and mix well.
  • In a mixing bowl, combine salt, baking powder and flour. Add to butter mixture all at once and mix just until combined. Scrape dough onto plastic wrap and form in a flat disk. Cover and refrigerate at least one hour.
  • After dough has chilled, lightly dust a work surface with flour. Divide dough into 12 equal parts and roll out the dough to fit pie tins. You may roll dough scraps over again but be careful not to incorporate too much flour or dough will become crumbly. You may have to chill the scraps again before you roll them. Once you have rolled out the pie shells, fit them into pie tins making sure the dough reaches the outer rim of the tins. Return tins to refrigerator.
  • Prepare almond streusel and set aside.
  • To make filling, preheat oven to 375-degrees. Combine unwashed berries with remaining 2-1/2 to 3 cups sugar (depending on sweetness of berries), cornstarch and vanilla. Immediately spoon about 1-1/2 cups of the berry mixture into each tart shell. It is okay to heap the filling in the shells. The berries will cook down. (See notes).
  • Divide almond streusel evenly among pies. Set on cookie sheets and bake in preheated oven 20 to 25 minutes or until streusel is golden and you see juice from the berries bubbling up in the center of the pies. Remove from oven and cool. Recipe makes 12 pies, one serving each.

Almond Streusal Recipe

Ingredients:Fresh almonds
1-1/4 cups sugar
1/2 cup plus 2 tablespoons of flour
3/4 cup (1-1/2 sticks) cold, unsalted butter cut in very small pieces
1/2 cup sliced blanched almonds

Directions:
Combine sugar and flour. Cut in butter using two knives, your fingers or a food processor. Toss almonds with butter/flour mixture. Refrigerate until ready to use. Divide streusel evenly between pies.

Recipe Notes

  1. Pastry recipe makes enough for 12 individual, 7-ounce pies. You may use disposable pie tins. They should measure at least three inches across the bottom, five inches across the top and be at least 1-3/8-inches high. You my find them at kitchen supply stores and some large grocery stores.
  2. Not washing the berries again will prevent excess liquid in the filling.
  3. After adding sugar and cornstarch to berries, very quickly add mixture to crusts, top with streusel and bake. If berry mixture sits too long, you will have too much liquid.

Fresh washed raspberries

Wild Berry Crumble

Wild Berry Crumble

This wild berry crumble recipe turns out a simple to make, delicious, and very healthy alternative to standard cooked berry crumbles.

By keeping the fruit raw, this recipe has an alkalizing effect on the body. Cooking fruit has an acidifying effect on your body.

Wild Berry Crumble Berries

Wild Berry Crumble Recipe

Base:
1 cup oats
1/2 cup almonds
1/4 teaspoon cinnamon
3 tablespoons unpasteurized honey

Combine the above ingredients in a food processor. Process until mixed, but still slightly coarse. Divide evenly among small dessert bowls (approximately four).

Fruit Filling:
2 cups mixed berries, frozen or fresh

Divide the fruit among the four dessert bowls, placing it on top of the oat and almond mixture.

Sauce:
1/2 cup unsweetened juice (apple, pear, or another of your choice)
1 tablespoon Arrowroot Powder

Combine the juice and arrowroot in a small saucepan. Bring to boil, stirring constantly, until mixture thickens. Pour over the fruit. Refrigerate until set (1 to 2 hours) and serve.

Recipe Note

Alternatively, make Wild Berry Crumble the day before serving.

You may also like…

  • Nutritious Berries – Berries pack quite a nutritional bang for your buck! They provide important amounts of vitamins, especially vitamin C, plenty of fiber, plus antioxidants and phytochemicals. All are known to help prevent certain diseases.
  • Exceptional Blueberries – Bursting with flavor and boasting the highest antioxidant level of any fruit or vegetable, the simple blueberry abounds with flavor and good nutrition. Blueberries are naturally sweet and low in calories. They are easy to eat, cook or bake with and exceptionally nutritious.

Beneficial Berries

Beneficial Berries

*February is Berry Fresh Month.

Beneficial berries have literally earned a “health halo” in the world of nutrition. In fact, berries have also become the favorite fruit of the public at large. Of all fruits, consumer research finds strawberries the absolute favorite among adults and kids.

Over the past decade, multiple research findings support the health benefits of berries, showing that they have a profound impact on chronic diseases, such as cancer, cardiovascular disease, diabetes and age-related mental decline.

 

Fresh beneficial berries.
Fresh beneficial berries.

Berry Botany

In botanical terms, a berry is a fleshy fruit in which the entire plant ovary wall ripens into a soft fruit surrounding seeds. Thus, the definition for berries extends to include fruits like tomatoes, grapes and avocados. But in common terms, “berries” refers to the small fruits with multiple seeds we are familiar with today.

The largest bodies of berry research focus on traditional beneficial berries: Blackberries, black raspberries, blueberries, cranberries, red raspberries and strawberries.

Berries have been an important part of culinary traditions, as well. From preserving berries to pressing them for juice. These practices stretch across many cultures and date back centuries.

Berries are low in calories, sodium and fat, and high in fiber, potassium and vitamin C. This profile makes them a perfect food for supporting heart health, normal blood pressure and weight loss.

It goes beyond their fiber, vitamin and mineral content, too. Berries are packed with antioxidants. Plants put their best compounds on their outer layers and in seeds. A plant can’t get up and put sunscreen on to protect itself from environmental damage. You eat it all with berries – they are loaded with skins and seeds and you don’t even realize it. Berries are colored by pigments known as anthocyanins. These compounds make blueberries blue and strawberries red.

Disease Busting Berries

Scientists can trace several ways that berries can mediate disease. They can target oxidative stress, inflammation, immune function and metabolism.

Berry compounds work on multiple mechanisms in the body. They are hitting the pro-inflammatory processes and the central pathways linked with diseases such as cancer, cardiovascular disease and Alzheimer’s disease.

Nuts and Berries. Are you getting enough nuts and berries in your diet? Eating foods rich in antioxidants may reduce your risk of Alzheimer’s disease, according to a recent study published in the Archives of Neurology. The study indicates that people with diets high in vitamins C and E are about 60 percent less likely to develop dementia and Alzheimer’s disease than people whose diets are low in these vitamins. Researchers report that the key to reducing the risk is the combination of the two vitamins. Neither vitamin has been proven to be independently effective in warding off the disease, which affects approximately 4 million Americans.

Mixed fresh berries

While scientists continue to learn more about how berry compounds work in humans, there are some facts we can take to the bank.

  • Berries are healthy.
  • Cranberries can prevent urinary tract infections.
  • Blueberries are important in brain health.
  • Berry compounds target pro-inflammatory pathways.

Sweet Berry Pickings

Blackberries: Choose deep, evenly colored berries with a nice sheen. Blackberries should be plump and dry, with no dents or bruises. Colors can range from deep blue-purple to deep purple-black. Blackberries are often two-tone (this does not affect ripeness or taste). These beneficial berries are delicious.

Blueberries: Select dry, plump round berries that don’t have any dents or bruises. Look for a soft, hazy-white coating, called bloom, on the skin. This is naturally found in blueberries and helps protect them from the harsh rays of the sun. Avoid berries that are shriveled or lack bloom.

Raspberries: Look for plump, evenly colored red or golden raspberries that have a soft, hazy gloss. Berries should be free of dents and bruises. Raspberries have tiny, natural hairs called styles, which don’t affect their ripeness or their flavor.

Freezing Raspberries, Blueberries and Blackberries

  1. Spread unwashed raspberries or blueberries on rimmed baking sheet. Blackberries require rinsing under cold running water. Pat dry, then put on sheet.
  2. Clear an area in your freezer that is large enough to accommodate baking sheet with berries. Freeze berries, uncovered, until solid, at least 3 hours or overnight.
  3. Transfer frozen berries to zip-close zipper freezer bags. Squeeze out air, seal each bag, and then label with the date. Berries can be frozen up to 3 months.
  4. Thaw berries in refrigerator overnight if desired. Just before using, gently rinse thawed (or frozen) berries under cold running water. Drain.

Try fitting beneficial berries into your diet every day. They’re delicious!

See also:  What the Colors in Fruits Mean to Your Body