Go Green with Broccoli Pops

Broccoli Pops thumbnail

Go Green with Broccoli Pops

Eating frozen vegetables? Well, yes! In fact, through many a discussion with mothers it was discovered some could get their kids to eat vegetables this way.

In short, nutritious broccoli pops are probably one of those things you have to try to see if it holds appeal for you.

Broccoli Pops
Broccoli Pops

Getting Started

First of all, to get the best results, make sure your broccoli is fresh and crisp. Old broccoli, which is usually limp, will make nasty-tasting broccoli pops. The best quality broccoli are those that are tight, before the florets start to open and turn a yellow color.

You’ll want to choose firm, young and tender stalks with compact heads. Split your flowerets lengthwise so they are no more than 1-1/2 inches across. And don’t forget to remove leaves and woody portions. Separate the broccoli heads into bite-size portions.

Prepare the Broccoli

Soak the broccoli in brine for 30 minutes to remove insects. Then rinse under fast running water. For the brine, you use 4 teaspoons salt to 1 gallon ordinary tap water.

Blanch the broccoli. Blanch the broccoli with steam for 5 minutes. This kills bacteria. If you are preparing a lot of broccoli, you may use the same blanching water several times (up to 5). Be sure to add more hot water from the tap from time to time to keep the water level at the required height.

Immediately cool broccoli in ice water and then drain thoroughly. Now you can drop pieces of your prepared broccoli into Popsicle molds and freeze! If you wish, you could puree the broccoli and place tightly (think packed brown sugar) into Popsicle molds. This option depends upon whether you want to A) do the extra work and B) want broccoli pops that melt in your mouth or need some chewing action.

Once your broccoli pops are frozen solid, remove them from the Popsicle molds and place into freezer bags or containers for best storage. They can easily get freezer burned if left in the molds.

The recommended storage time for frozen broccoli pops is 12 months for best for taste and quality. For the absolute BEST storage, be sure to get rid of any air from inside your freezer bags or containers. This will help avoid freezer burn. Vacuum-sealed bags are great for long term storage. A most popular tool for vacuum sealing (many, MANY uses) is the FoodSaver Vacuum Sealing System.

With its sleek, compact design and easy-to-use manual operation, the FoodSaver V2244 vacuum sealing system comes in handy for preserving a variety of foods. Use it for everything from long-term storage of meats and fish in the freezer to short-term storage of deli meats and cheese in the fridge, as well as cookies, crackers, and other snacks in the pantry.

Bonus Recipe:  Sweet Broccoli Salad

Like broccoli but not sure you’d care to eat it as a frozen treat? Give this salad recipe a try, instead! A delicious way to get raw broccoli into your diet. 

1 head of broccoli, chopped finely Salad Clip art
1 carrot, grated
2 apples, cored and chopped
1 cup raisins (Soak in water 1/3 hour before using. Drain and discard water.)
1/4 cup raw, unsalted sunflower seeds

Mix all the above  ingredients together.

Dressing:
1/2 cup extra-virgin oil
1 tablespoon unpasteurized apple cider vinegar
1 tablespoon unpasteurized honey

Mix the dressing ingredients together. Pour on vegetable mixture. Toss and enjoy.

Did you know?

Broccoli is the superhero of the vegetable kingdom with its rich vitamin A content.

Author: Jeni

Certified by the Professional School of Fitness and Nutrition in March, 1995; honored for exemplary grades. Practicing fitness and nutrition for over 20 years. Featured in the Feb. 1994 issue of "Shape" magazine. Featured in Collage in the spring issue of 1995 Low fat recipe's published in Taste of Home, Quick Cooking, and the Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel, among others. September, 2001: Featured in "Winning The War on Cholesterol" By Rodale Publishing

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